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Jerry Wright, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center at

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Citation
Wright, J. (2000). The Functional Assessment Measure. The Center for Outcome Measurement in Brain Injury. http://www.tbims.org/
combi/FAM ( accessed ).*

*Note: This citation is for the COMBI web material. Mr. Wright is not the scale author for the FAM.

 

 

 

 

FAM Testing Vignettes

Name

Email

Organization

Profession


1. Swallowing

Maria has a tendency to eat rapidly. She is on a modified diet and only needs occasional verbal prompting to decrease the speed of her eating.

Score

 

Charlie enjoys community dining. He requires no assistance in the preparation or consumption of his regular diet but is usually the last to finish.

Score

 

Abdul receives most of his nutrition by gastric tube, requiring maximum cueing in therapy to swallow safely.

Score

 

2. Car Transfer

Margo can lock her wheelchair brakes, but always requires moderate assistance for the transfer from her wheelchair to the car.

Score

 

Brittany has received training in transferring to a car. However, she still needs to be reminded of the proper sequence of steps involved.

Score

 

Luke has contracture of the muscles in the arms and legs. His parents lift him in and out of the family truck.

Score

 

3. Community Access

Mr. Jones relies on his daughter for transportation. he is only concerned with the destination; his daughter arranges all appointments and travel plans.

Score

 

Ms. Colton is able to independently use the bus system. She arranges her own personal schedule to work with the bus schedule. She also plans outings with her family on the weekends.

Score

 

Chester needs only incidental help to get to the store.

Score

 

4. Reading

Albert can read simple sentences without trouble. However, he needs cues to understand complex or long sentences.

Score

 

Jeremy is unable to recognize or even match letters or pictures.

Score

 

Rhoda enjoys reading her newspapers and novels and has no difficulty whatsoever in understanding lengthy and complex articles.

Score

 

5. Writing

Cindy is able to write simple sentences with cueing to express her thoughts. She sometimes needs help with grammar.

Score

 

Jill has difficulty expressing herself in writing. She is unable to form complete sentences, makes frequent spelling and grammatical errors, and has poor legibility.

Score

 

Sam is able to write complex sentences and paragraphs with only an average number of errors.

Score

 

6. Speech Intelligibility

Ralph speaks clearly but has decreased rate.

Score

 

Bernard can say "ah" and "o" without help but can imitate only a few short words intelligibly.

Score

 

Sophia will produce intelligible words and word groups but cannot produce sentences or express complex thoughts.

Score

 

7. Emotional Status

Candace exhibits lability in stressful situations; she also continually attempts to influence staff behavior and to avoid therapy sessions by crying.

Score

 

Ms. Sullivan becomes depressed and refuses to cooperate in therapy. While she assumes some responsibility for these behaviors, she still misses therapy once per week.

Score

 

Lee shows minimal anxiety and depression on occasion. However, he is able to tell his therapists what he is feeling and to work through the trouble with them.

Score

 

8. Adjustment to Limitations

Marcus has severe motor deficits; he is able to ambulate in his home safely and completes some household tasks. He states that he is aware of the nature of his injury, but he maintains his goal of playing college football.

Score

 

Annette is aware of her memory deficit, but has difficulty understanding how it affects some of her daily activities, and is resistant to learning new strategies. As a result, she occasionally requires cueing to use memory strategies.

Score

 

Guston feels the staff is condescending to him when teaching him ways to remember to perform basic hygiene tasks. He maintains his goal to return to his law practice within the month. Testing shows a severe memory deficit. He does not remember the hospital name or the nature of his accident.

Score

 

9. Employability

Anthony needs total assistance on all tasks of daily life.

Score

 

Jean is able to complete simple homemaking tasks. She requires no physical assistance and is able to follow a checklist of routine tasks if allowed extra time. She has worked as a maid in the past and wishes to return to this type of work.

Score

 

Although Martin requires only occasional physical assistance, he requires constant cueing by an assistant in order to function.

Score

 

 

10. Orientation

 

Ms. Goddard is able to accurately state her name, the date, and her location if she is in her room and able to use the calendar as a cue.

Score

 

Mr. Butler is only able to state his name and what happened to him; he is not oriented to time or location.

Score

 

Victoria is oriented only to her own name, requiring cueing most of the time for all other orientation components.

Score

 

11. Attention

Molly requires maximal structure to maintain attention for more than 2 or 3 minutes, and is very easily distracted.

Score

 

Ron is able to attend to a task for about 30 minutes but is readily distracted.

Score

 

Howard is able to attend long enough to complete most tasks, but he often needs to redirect his attention and this delays completion.

Score

 

12. Safety Judgment

Ms. Eckerd is able to perform routine grocery shopping and household tasks and can function at home alone. She does require supervision in unfamiliar community settings.

Score

 

Jay needs close supervision at all times to keep him from hurting himself impulsively.

Score

 

Hal is considered safe without supervision in his room where all sharp edged furniture has been removed.

Score


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